The Language Gap

Spoilers for “Arrival” (2016)

“Artists use lies to tell the truth.” .

I remember hearing that in my first of many viewings of V for Vendetta and being intrigued by it. As a good Christian boy, and now minister, I was taught that lying was a sin and something to be avoided but could lies really tell the truth? As time has gone by I have connected this line with my love of fiction. I have come to love stories that are simple on the surface but have a bigger meaning for those who have ears to listen.

A recent story that stood out to me was when I watched “Arrival” (2016) starring Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner for 1 Geek 4:11’s “Must See” Movie of the Week. Part way through the movie, we get to a scene where Adams and Renner’s characters introduce the audience to something called the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis which is basically that the way that someone understands language, especially the language they speak, influences how they perceive the world. While there is some scientific stretching going on in the movie there is some great truth to the sentiment.

As a Christian geek I have often feel that there was a “language gap” when it comes to interacting with other Christians; the stories that pointed me to a deeper understanding of Christ and life were all… well geeky. It takes a certain type of person to learn something about Jesus’ parables through a story of a crazy guy trying to blow up Parliament, or about how our worldview as Christians is influenced by our language as geeks. Whenever I look back I Jesus in the Bible at Jesus’ ministry I see an artist, one who would speak directly but who would also use fiction, to connect His listeners to the Kingdom of God and to me there is so much beauty in that truth.

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Cameron is a youth minister and co-founder of 1 Geek 4:11 Podcast. He enjoys PS4, board games, Magic the Gathering, and his hobbies include pretty much anything geeky he can get his hands on (and Frisbee). You can find him on Twitter: @humarwhitill

 

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